Word Of The Day 4-10-2017

prolix

pro·lix \prō-ˈliks

Definition

  1. unduly prolonged or drawn out :  too long

  2. marked by or using an excess of words


Examples

  1. The speech was unnecessarily prolix.

  2. a person known for habitually transforming brief anecdotes into prolix sagas that exhaust their listeners.


Did You Know?

There’s no way to talk about prolix without being redundant, verbose, and wordy. That’s because the word is a synonym of all of those long-winded terms. Of those words, prolix is the one most likely to suggest unreasonable and tedious dwelling on details. It derives from prolixus, a Latin term meaning “extended” or “copious.” Prolixus originated from a combination of the prefix pro- (which means “forward”) and the past participle of liquēre, a verb meaning “to be fluid.” True to that history, something that is prolix flows on and on.


Origin

Middle English, from Anglo-French & Latin; Anglo-French prolix, from Latin prolixus extended, from pro- forward + liquēre to be fluid — more at liquid

First Known Use: 15th century


https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/prolix

 

 

 

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