Sunday Photo Fiction 5-27-2017

Each week a photo is used, donated by one of the participants of Sunday Photo Fiction, and the idea is to write a story with the photo as a prompt in around 200 words.

200-05-may-21st-2017

He stood outside Traitor’s Gate, waiting, watching, thinking ‘traitor’ wasn’t necessary the best name for the place. Upsetting-the-King Gate might be the better title. Either way meant death.

The stink from the river rose up around him, a smell he’d known every day of his life, but had never grown accustomed to smelling. The river, the heat and the stink of unwashed bodies defined his world.

The sound of the boat coming down the river came to him, sharp and clear. Wood on wood. Water on wood. Oar by oar by oar.

The Prince sat quiet in the center of the boat, hooded, head bowed, resigned to his fate. Once he was dead, nothing would stand in the way of the Pretender. And that would be the end of Britain as they now knew it.

The Gate creaked upwards. The Prince’s body shivered. The Gate closed.

He stood for another moment then turned away. Just because Britain would be different didn’t mean it would be bad.

Word Of The Day 5-27-2017

noyade

no·yade \(ˈ)nwä¦yäd, (ˈ)nwī¦äd\
Popularity: Bottom 10% of words

Definition

an execution by drowning :  a mass drowning

Example

  • ‘Perhaps 1,800 perished altogether in the noyades, and their bodies were washed up on the tidal banks of the Loire for weeks afterwards.’
  • ‘Although absent from the novel’s descriptive chain of images, the noyade makes itself known to the reader by scattered traces throughout the text.’

Did You Know?

The Drownings at Nantes (French: Noyades de Nantes) were a series of mass executions by drowning during the Reign of Terror in Nantes, France, that occurred between November 1793 and February 1794. During this period, anyone arrested and jailed for not consistently supporting the Revolution, or suspected of being a royalist sympathizer, especially Catholic priests and nuns, was cast into the Loire and drowned on the orders of Jean-Baptiste Carrier, the representative-on-mission in Nantes. Before the murders ceased, as many as four thousand or more people, including innocent families with women and children, died in what Carrier himself called “the national bathtub”.[1]

Origin

French, from noyer to drown, from Late Latin necare, from Latin, to kill, from nec-, nex violent death


https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/noyade

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drownings_at_Nantes