Word Of The Day 5-22-2017

 

Psithurism

noun

Definition

whisper of wind in the trees, noise of leaves that move in the wind; whispering sound

Origin

An adaptation of the Ancient Greek ψιθύρισµα (psithurisma) or ψιθυρισµός (psithurismos), from ψιθυρίζω (psithurizō, “I whisper”), from ψίθυρος (psithuros, “whispering”, “slanderous”).


http://www.yourdictionary.com/psithurism


An interesting post I found about psithurism:

https://sesquiotic.wordpress.com/2011/01/20/psithurism/

Word Of The Day 5-17-2017

cunctation

(kŭngk-tā′shən)

noun


Definition

 Procrastination; delay.

Examples

  • Though Patience suffers in the Modern Crush, Perchance the Socialistic perorator Might learn a lesson from the great Cunctator!

    Various

  • The rule of Cunctator must have an end, for the rashness of Scipio can only end this war.

    Coffin, Charles Carleton

  • He fought again at Cannae, and was, with the son of old Fabius Cunctator, among the very few young officers who escaped alive.

    Hamilton, Mary Agnes

  • Cunctator Meade may have some lucid moment, and punish Lee for his impertinence.

    De Gurowski, Adam G., count


Did You Know?

 A cunctator has a habit of postponing or delaying action, often out of laziness. When you come across this unusual word, it’s very often capitalized — in this case, it refers specifically to the Roman statesman Fabius Maximus, who became well-known for his cautious military strategy against the Carthaginians during the Second Punic War in the 200s BCE. He was called the Cuncator, Latin for “delayer.”

 Origin

 [Latin cūnctātiō, cūnctātiōn-, from cūnctātus, past participle of cūnctārī, to delay; see konk- in the Appendix of Indo-European roots.]

Word Of The Day 5-16-2017

pultaceous

adjective

pul·ta·ceous \ˌpəl-ˈtā-shəs\


Definition

Macerated; softened; nearly fluid.


Examples

If double boiler be used no water need be added, and thus the rice will be dry and not pultaceous.
No Animal Food and Nutrition and Diet with Vegetable Recipes

Mix some bread and meat with gastric juice; place them in a phial, and keep that phial in a sand-bath at the slow heat of 98 degrees, occasionally shaking briskly the contents to imitate the motion of the stomach; you will find, after six or eight hours, the whole contents blended into one pultaceous mass.
Grappling with the Monster The Curse and the Cure of Strong Drink


Origin

Mid 17th century; earliest use found in Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. From classical Latin pult-, puls pap, pottage + -aceous.


https://www.merriam-webster.com/medical/pultaceous

https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/us/pultaceous

Word For The Day 5-15-2017

orphic

or·phic \ˈȯr-fik\
Popularity: Bottom 40% of word

Definition

  1. of or relating to Orpheus or the rites or doctrines ascribed to him

  2. having an import not apparent to the senses nor obvious to the intelligence; beyond ordinary understanding

Examples

Starving will kill as dead as hanging, was Lieders’s Orphic response to this. –Stories of a Western Town Octave Thanet

He was represented in the Orphic Theology under the mixed symbol of a lionand serpent: and sometimes of a serpent only. –A New System; or, an Analysis of Antient Mythology. Volume II. (of VI.) Jacob Bryant


Did You Know?

Orpheus was a hero of Greek mythology who was supposed to possess superhuman musical skills. With his legendary lyre, he was said to be able to make even the rocks and trees dance around. In fact, when his wife Eurydice died, he was nearly able to use his lyre to secure her return from the underworld. Later on, according to legend, he was killed at the bidding of Dionysus, and an oracle of Orpheus was established that came to rival the oracle of Apollo at Delphi. Because of the oracle of Orpheus, orphic can mean “oracular.” Because of Orpheus’ musical powers, orphic can mean “entrancing.”


Origin

1670-80; < Greek Orphikós (cognate with Latin Orphicus), equivalent toOrph(eús) Orpheus + -ikos -ic


https://www.vocabulary.com/dictionary/orphic