Word Of The Day 4-7-2017

jettatura

noun


 Definition

a curse of the evil eye, whereby all that the cursed looks upon will suffer bad luck.

Examples

  • If he who takes tobacco is not more to be feared than he who wears spectacles? and if spectacles, peruke, and snuff-box combined do not triple the force of the _jettatura?  The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 05, No. 32, June, 1860

  • Things have, indeed, somewhat changed since the days of Didymus, in this respect, that men are now thought to be more potent for evil _jettatura_ than women; but his general views still coincide with those entertained at the present time in Italy.  The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 05, No. 32, June, 1860

Word Of The Day 4-2-2017

Montivagant

(Adjective)


Definition

Wandering over hills and mountains.


Examples

As headlong rolls the torrent of the hills
When wintry storms montivagent outpour
Their pluvious treasures from the deep purloined. 

J. F. Pennie, Rogvald: An Epic Poem, in Twelve Books, G. and W. B. Whittaker

Aircraft are all nubivagant, gorillas are all nemorivagant, and a holiday in Snowdonia could be described as a montivagant weekend.

Mark Forsyth, The Horologian: A Day’s Jaunt Through the Lost Words, Berkley (2012)


Origin

Mont-” meaning mountain.

-vagant” stems from Latin vagārī or Latin vagō, which means to wander. Same etymology as vagrant and vagabond.


Word Of The Day 3-11-2017

obnubilate

ob·nu·bi·late \äb-ˈnü-bə-ˌlāt, -ˈnyü-\
Popularity: Bottom 30% of word

Defination

1. To darken or obscure with clouds; becloud: a storm that obnubilated the sky.
2. To cause to be unable to think clearly; confuse: Superstition obnubilated their minds.
3. To make hard to understand or follow; obscure: an important idea that was obnubilated by poor writing.

Origin and Etymology

Latin obnubilatus, past participle of obnubilare, from ob- in the way + nubilare to be cloudy, from nubilus cloudy, from nubes cloud — more at ob-, nuance

First Known Use: 1583

Did You Know?

The meaning of obnubilate becomes clearer when you know that its ancestors are the Latin terms ob– (meaning “in the way”) and nubes (“cloud”). It’s a high-flown sounding word, which may be why it often turns up in texts by and about politicians. This has been true for a long time. In fact, when the U.S. Constitution was up for ratification, 18th-century Pennsylvania statesman James Wilson used obnubilate to calm fears that the president would have too much power: “Our first executive magistrate is not obnubilated behind the mysterious obscurity of counsellors…. He is the dignified, but accountable magistrate of a free and great people.”