Word Of The Day 5-23-2017

mystagogue

mys·ta·gogue \ˈmis-tə-ˌgäg\
Popularity: Bottom 10% of words

 Definition

  1. 1:  one who initiates another into a mystery cult

  2. 2:  one who understands or teaches mystical doctrines


Examples

17111, which in Greek, transliterated as Hieronymus, means “bearer of the sacred name,” is the mystagogue who knows the hidden meanings of his text.

The latter have long since carried the day against the allegorically credulous Graves and his ignorant or unscrupulous informant, the Sufi mystagogue votary Omar Ali-Shah.


In ancient mystery religions, a mystagogue would be responsible for leading an initiate into the secret teachings and rituals of the cult. The initiate would often be blindfolded, and the mystagogue would literally “guide” him into the sacred space.

In the early church, this same concept was used to describe the bishop, who was responsible for seeing to it that the catechumens were properly prepared for baptism. Homilies given to those in the last stages of preparation, and which deal with the sacraments are called “Mystagogical Homilies.” Sometimes these mystagogical instructions were not given until after the catechumen had been baptized. The most famous of these mystagogical works are the “Mystagogical Homilies” of St. Cyril of Jerusalem and the work, “On the Mysteries” by St. Ambrose of Milan.

In various organizations, it is the role of the mystagogue to “mystify” pledges. The term is sometimes used to refer to a person who guides people through religious sites, such as churches, and explains the various artifacts. This branch of theology is at times called mystagogy.

In the United States versions of Mystagogical legends predate European contact. Early Native American tribes around the Great Lakes region, prompted the idea that the Mystagogue was a spiritual leader, and upon death would transform into a beast with many heads. The Mystagogue would reappear in his beastly form and feed on those who strayed from the tribe if it was not in keeping with their religious customs.

The historical tradition of the Mystagogue has carried on today through the fraternity system in American universities, that have historically held a position for the Mystagogue at either the chapter or the national level. The Mystagogue is a person of great respect, and his knowledge concerning both the physical and spiritual matters of the organization is not questioned. Similar to Native American traditions the Mystagogue in the Fraternity system has the power to shut down parts of their Fraternity which are not in keeping with customs or tradition.

Max Weber, considered to be one of the founders of the modern study of sociology, described the mystagogue as part magician, part prophet; and as one who dispensed “magical actions that contain the boons of salvation” According to Roy Wallis, “The primary criterion that Weber had in mind in distinguishing the prophet from the mystagogue was that the latter offers a largely magical means of salvation rather than proclaiming a radical religious ethic or an example to be followed.”


Origin

class=”card-box-title”>Latin mystagogus, from Greek mystagōgos, from mystēs initiate (perhaps akin to Greek myein to be closed) + agein to lead — more at agent

First Known Use: circa 1540

Word Of The Day 5-22-2017

 

Psithurism

noun

Definition

whisper of wind in the trees, noise of leaves that move in the wind; whispering sound

Origin

An adaptation of the Ancient Greek ψιθύρισµα (psithurisma) or ψιθυρισµός (psithurismos), from ψιθυρίζω (psithurizō, “I whisper”), from ψίθυρος (psithuros, “whispering”, “slanderous”).


http://www.yourdictionary.com/psithurism


An interesting post I found about psithurism:

https://sesquiotic.wordpress.com/2011/01/20/psithurism/

Word Of The Day 5-17-2017

cunctation

(kŭngk-tā′shən)

noun


Definition

 Procrastination; delay.

Examples

  • Though Patience suffers in the Modern Crush, Perchance the Socialistic perorator Might learn a lesson from the great Cunctator!

    Various

  • The rule of Cunctator must have an end, for the rashness of Scipio can only end this war.

    Coffin, Charles Carleton

  • He fought again at Cannae, and was, with the son of old Fabius Cunctator, among the very few young officers who escaped alive.

    Hamilton, Mary Agnes

  • Cunctator Meade may have some lucid moment, and punish Lee for his impertinence.

    De Gurowski, Adam G., count


Did You Know?

 A cunctator has a habit of postponing or delaying action, often out of laziness. When you come across this unusual word, it’s very often capitalized — in this case, it refers specifically to the Roman statesman Fabius Maximus, who became well-known for his cautious military strategy against the Carthaginians during the Second Punic War in the 200s BCE. He was called the Cuncator, Latin for “delayer.”

 Origin

 [Latin cūnctātiō, cūnctātiōn-, from cūnctātus, past participle of cūnctārī, to delay; see konk- in the Appendix of Indo-European roots.]

Word For The Day 5-15-2017

orphic

or·phic \ˈȯr-fik\
Popularity: Bottom 40% of word

Definition

  1. of or relating to Orpheus or the rites or doctrines ascribed to him

  2. having an import not apparent to the senses nor obvious to the intelligence; beyond ordinary understanding

Examples

Starving will kill as dead as hanging, was Lieders’s Orphic response to this. –Stories of a Western Town Octave Thanet

He was represented in the Orphic Theology under the mixed symbol of a lionand serpent: and sometimes of a serpent only. –A New System; or, an Analysis of Antient Mythology. Volume II. (of VI.) Jacob Bryant


Did You Know?

Orpheus was a hero of Greek mythology who was supposed to possess superhuman musical skills. With his legendary lyre, he was said to be able to make even the rocks and trees dance around. In fact, when his wife Eurydice died, he was nearly able to use his lyre to secure her return from the underworld. Later on, according to legend, he was killed at the bidding of Dionysus, and an oracle of Orpheus was established that came to rival the oracle of Apollo at Delphi. Because of the oracle of Orpheus, orphic can mean “oracular.” Because of Orpheus’ musical powers, orphic can mean “entrancing.”


Origin

1670-80; < Greek Orphikós (cognate with Latin Orphicus), equivalent toOrph(eús) Orpheus + -ikos -ic


https://www.vocabulary.com/dictionary/orphic

defenestration

play

noun de·fen·es·tra·tion  dē-ˌfe-nə-ˈstrā-shən\
Popularity: Bottom 50% of words

  1.   a throwing of a person or thing out of a window assassination by defenestration

  2.   a usually swift dismissal or expulsion (as from a political party or office) the 

Self-defenestration (autodefenestration) is the act of jumping, propelling oneself, or causing oneself to fall, out of a window.


Examples

Thedefenestration, in fact, only precipitated a conflictthat was in any case inevitable.

Be that as it may, his defenestration was coldly abrupt, and in his place, the Football Association resurrected a veteran manager and former England star in Joe Mercer for seven games.
2005 September 4, The Sunday Times, London

Did You Know?

These days defenestration is often used to describe the forceful removal of someone from public office or from some other advantageous position. History’s most famous defenestration, however, was one in which the tossing out the window was quite literal. On May 23, 1618, two imperial regents were found guilty of violating certain guarantees of religious freedom. As punishment, they were thrown out the window of Prague Castle. The men survived the 50-foot tumble into the moat, but the incident, which became known as the Defenestration of Prague, marked the beginning of the Bohemian resistance to Hapsburg rule that eventually led to the Thirty Years’ War.


Origin

The word comes from the New Latin  de- (out of or away from) and fenestra (window or opening).


https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/defenestration

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Defenestration

 

Word Of The Day 5-12-2017

bodement

bode·ment \ˈbōd-mənt\
Popularity: Bottom 30% of words

Definition

An omen; portent; prognostic; a foreshadowing


Examples

That clinging mist seemed of evil bodement for our expedition.
The Roof of France

As they recovered from the effects of his bodement, the people left the theatre, their minds full of indefinite dread.
The fair god, or, The last of the ‘Tzins

I wish indeed for the glad sympathy of my people, for I think that our Saviour turning water into wine at the wedding, was an example set that we should rejoice and be merry at the fulfilment of one of the great obligations imposed on us as social creatures; and I have ever regarded the unhonoured treatment of a marriage occasion as a thing of evil bodement, betokening heavy hearts and light purses to the lot of the bride and bridegroom.
The Ayrshire Legatees, or, the Pringle family


Origin

The word ‘bodement’ comes from ‘bode’ (“announce”) +‎ ‘-ment’.