Word Of The Day 5-17-2017

cunctation

(kŭngk-tā′shən)

noun


Definition

 Procrastination; delay.

Examples

  • Though Patience suffers in the Modern Crush, Perchance the Socialistic perorator Might learn a lesson from the great Cunctator!

    Various

  • The rule of Cunctator must have an end, for the rashness of Scipio can only end this war.

    Coffin, Charles Carleton

  • He fought again at Cannae, and was, with the son of old Fabius Cunctator, among the very few young officers who escaped alive.

    Hamilton, Mary Agnes

  • Cunctator Meade may have some lucid moment, and punish Lee for his impertinence.

    De Gurowski, Adam G., count


Did You Know?

 A cunctator has a habit of postponing or delaying action, often out of laziness. When you come across this unusual word, it’s very often capitalized — in this case, it refers specifically to the Roman statesman Fabius Maximus, who became well-known for his cautious military strategy against the Carthaginians during the Second Punic War in the 200s BCE. He was called the Cuncator, Latin for “delayer.”

 Origin

 [Latin cūnctātiō, cūnctātiōn-, from cūnctātus, past participle of cūnctārī, to delay; see konk- in the Appendix of Indo-European roots.]